Blog 5 Secondary Research Lit review: who said what Thursday 11th October

So the following is a list of all of the research I did into the topic of identity politics and oppression Olympics I started out by typing in straight white male Irish into google and the top SEO link is: https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/frankie-gaffney-i-don-t-believe-straight-white-men-are-the-most-oppressed-group-1.3149487

Which is an article about a podcast on the Irish Womens Podcast, strangely enough there isn’t a male equivalent and when I mentioned it to another one of my lecturers she explained sure isn’t Off the ball a male podcast ignoring the fact and point of the Irish women’s podcast this was the start misandry. The point of the Irish Womens Podcast is to highlight women’s issues in Ireland and around the world. A point I will be at pains to repeat I support and admire. What I don’t support and admire however is the attitude the the idea of having a male equivalent. This was while I didn’t yet know it my first introduction to toxic femininity.

This is something I have learned through painful and painstaking experience and research. Men and women need each other! Straight people and gay people need each other and both need trans people!  Black and White Brown and Yellow people need each other, we all need the ying to our yang, we all need each other and we shouldn’t exclude each other. If we do it is too our detriment and sadly through my research and experience i see this rift, this chasm widen.

An article was one by a gentleman called frank Gaffeny being the true millennial that I am I found attached to the article a podcast and so in true fashion and true to my different consumption needs i downloaded the podcast it was on as part of the Irish women’s podcast.

Having read the article and listened to the podcast I discovered that there had been and atricle written in response to gaffeny’s his was called “Identity politics is utterly ineffective at anything other than dividing people” and the response was one called Cop On Comrades https://feministire.com/2017/05/25/cop-on-comrades/ with a tag line of not your fluffy feminism it seems to bespeak of hate speech but look I’m all for hate speech I might and do not agree with it but will fight and die for their ability to say what they wish to say. The way to beat bad ideas is not to suppress them it is to explain to them wher why and how they got it wrong the 5 why’s and one H of Journalism me thinks.

A point made most eloquently in this interview by Owen Jones Meets Johnathan Pie the satirical commentator albeit but is so on the money here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nA6OwzQ-P1Q

 

After Listening to the podcast and hearing Gaffney get scalded and brow beaten down into all but submission. He was able to fire off one last bullet in the form of a book recommendation, that of Angela Nagle called “Kill all Normies”. I should take this time to point out how much I admire Gaffney’s valiant efforts to defend his perfectly reasonable article and face with the wrath of the misandrous presenter Kathy Sheridan and the other conservative male virtue signalling cowards. It was clear to see they all had other more valuable skin in the game and in the winds that blow in this political climate of #metoo not a man among ye is fit or brave enough to stick his head above the para-pit. Perfectly understandable they have mortages and kids to feed. if i was in their position I would do the same. But I am not in their position.

Equally poinent is the law quote for a man for all season

Where we see illustrated beautifully the importance and necessity for the rule of law and the upholding of the Judaical process of due process.

I go on here to try to organise my thoughts on the subject and I fear I may have rather gotten off track and into the weeds on this one. With topics like  GamerGate Intersaectionality,  the Overton window, Cyber-utopianism

There were however some notable exceptions such as Ray O’Neill. “Once you start questioning masculinity, you’ve already become unmasculine.” who really for me hit the nail on the head and further on with James Behans of mens voices ireland with his article in the Journal ” Men DO open up about their problems – but no-one is listening”.

With paragraph titles like:

  • Men shamed if they failed to ‘man up’
  • Fathers’ rights
  • Men’s issues trivialised

the reverse pay gap was another nice little reminder that the quality paradigm had shift certainly for men and women without children with a 17% inverse difference in pay between men and women meaning women get paid 17% more than men when both do not have children.

I have left in the remained of my research material as it was quite exhaustive but I was able to use it ass a good way of storing all my research from class. I found it extremely difficult and challenging to work in scroll as thew computers only have one monitor this is stone age thinking on the colleges part. It is akin to having only one eye. I kept trying to find where i put documents this was and is one of the biggest challenges of working at college.

Blog Template

Update on tasks
What work did you begin/complete in this session?

I completed the literature review and the collected all of the relevant salient points gremaine to my hypotheses the where who what and why’s of each point were covered in depth.
Did you fulfil tasks as outlined in project management plan?

Yes
Are you on track to meet next deadline?

Yes
Did you have enough time to complete the tasks?

Yes Just but I am playing catch up.
Risks/issues
Did you identify any risks/issues with lack of skills required to deliver tasks?

The risks were that I would sound like that which i detest most in others to judge based on things that people have no control over namely racism homophobia and misogyny
Did you bring these to the tutor’s attention?
What was their response?

yes but it was difficult to get the time and space to do so discreetly or in private which I found regrettable
Problems
What barriers did you encounter in this session?
How did you overcome these barriers?

I covered a lot of this above but I just tried to find points that supported mine in other people opinions in films and on social media
New ideas and global changes
Were there changes made to the project direction/management plan/deadlines this session?

No
Personal reflection
How did you feel when you encountered barriers in this session?
How well have you performed?

again i felt frustrated I did however enjoy the class where i collected most of the literature review material as the song which was played in class was hall and otes

What did you contribute?
Did you help any of your team members in this session?
What can you improve on next week?

N/a

I have also included pictures of my class notes from my folder as evidence

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This is all of the class notes that lead up to the literature review class giving background into my thought processes regarding the research topic/ Hypothesis, a lot of it just my thoughts on paper unedited and unresearched but it gives some good context if you can make it out.

I have left the uncut unedited lit review notes below for context and so you could see my workings.


why its not OK to be a straight white male in Ireland I say in Ireland but today most of our lives are spent online and so in Ireland no longer means just in Ireland Angela Nagle writes in her book “kill all normies” that
1)”social media is where most young people now develop their political ideas for the first time”.
1 A)Social media has played a significant role in shaping the debate and mobilising voters in the same-sex marriage referendum, according to preliminary figures compiled by campaigns.This is the where what who and the why is that I was attempting to show the cultural context of the social media and give it an Irish context I ended up not going with this as it was a couple of years out of date 

Harry McGee Fri, May 22nd 2015 https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/social-media-plays-major-role-in-irish-poll-for-first-time-1.2222859
2) Franky Gafney Straight white male” is an identity I didn’t choose. I mean it wasn’t a decision I had any say in, what sexuality, race, or gender I am. I was born this way. But also, “straight white male” was never something I chose to “identify” as. At various times if you’d asked me about my identity, I might have said “Irish”, “a Dub”, or “working class”, but never straight, white, or male – let alone the arbitrary combination of all three. But people who talk a lot about “choice” and “freedom” chose for me, and decided that’s what my identity should be reduced to.

2 a)J Peterson that ‘the problem with the fractionation by group identity is that it’s endless, there’s no way of insuring equality across groups because there’s an infinite number of groups’.

2b)Tom walker video on inustagram
2 c) Redmond does give some attention to the plight of SWM “Working-class ‘straight white men’ in Ireland don’t have it easy these days. They never did. They are ignored by a political class that couldn’t care less about them. They should have a say in the decisions that affect their lives, but they often don’t.

3 a) Gamer gate The commonly cited start-point is one of classic scandal and rumour. Angry ex-boyfriend of a female game developer writes a long rant about how the game developer had intimate relations with a game journalist and received positive coverage for her game. Although the allegations have been disproven, they were a spark to a smouldering powder keg .https://www.independent.ie/entertainment/games/gamers/opinion-gamergate-in-all-its-glory-30690825.html
3b) Angela Nagle writes in her book “kill all normies”Gemergate brought gamers, rightest chan culture, anti feminism and the online far right closer to mainstreeam discussion and it also politicised a broad group of young people, mostly boys, who organised tactics around the idea of fighting back against the culture war being waged by the cultural far left.
https://www.independent.ie/entertainment/games/gamers/opinion-gamergate-in-all-its-glory-30690825.html

4a) it is hard to think of a better term than Gramscian to describe what they (the alt right) have strategically achieved, as a movement almost entirely based on influencing culture and shifting the Overton window through media and culture, not just formal politics they succeeded by bypassing the dying mainstream media and creating an internet culture and alternative media of their own from the ground up

4b)Why would a top digital media journalist want to risk his livelihood and drown his talents in the derided old MSM (mainstream media), perceived by many – gloatingly – as a dead man walking? https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/kathy-sheridan-holding-mainstream-media-to-account-in-era-of-fake-news-1.3399030

4c) Nagel writes Left cyberutopians claimed that “establishment old media could no longer control politics, that the new public sphere was going to be based on leaderless user generated social media

5a) the main preoccupation of this new culture was gender fluifdityand providing a safe space to explore other concerns like mental ill-health, physical disability, race cultural identity and intersectionality – thenow standard academic term for recognition of multiple varieties of interescting marginalisation and opperssions

5b) The sociologist, Patricia Hill Collins, describes such people as being subject to “interlocking systems of oppression”, as their lives are marked by “intersectionality”, that is, they are disadvantaged by virtue of their gender, race, and class, for instance. https://www.thejournal.ie/readme/column-irelands-political-system-must-embrace-diversity-to-foster-justice-809240-Feb2013/

6a) Nagel writes Left cyberutopians claimed that “establishment old media could no longer control politics, that the new public sphere was going to be based on leaderless user generated social media

6b) Tumblr was one of the most influential platforms for the emergence of a whole political and aesthetic sensibility, developing its own vocabulary and style very much the reverse image of the rightest chan in this way. it was here that Walter Benn Michaels critizised as a liberal preferance fore ‘recognition of diversity over economic inequality’ reached its most absurd apotheosis with the politics based on the minutia and the gradations of rapidly proliferating identities, and the emotional injuries of systemic cultural prejudices.Symbolic representatives and diversity and recognition became its goals as it admonished transgressors for erasing my identity and urged white straight men cis people to ‘listen and believe

7a) one is not born a woman but rather becomes a woman wrote french femisit and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir in 1949 by 1990 Judith Butler had taken this several steps further, or perhaps more literally, in Gender Trouble: Feminism and the subversion of identity, in which she argued that the coherence of the categories of sex, gender and sexuality were entirely culturally constructed through repetition of styled and cultivated bodily acts, which created the appearance of an essential ontological ‘core’ gender

7b) However, sociologists and most other social scientists view sex and gender as conceptually distinct. Sex refers to physical or physiological differences between males and females, including both primary sex characteristics (the reproductive system) and secondary characteristics such as height and muscularity. Gender is a term that refers to social or cultural distinctions associated with being male or female. Gender identity is the extent to which one identifies as being either masculine or feminine (Diamond 2002).

7c) A person’s sex, as determined by his or her biology, does not always correspond with his or her gender. Therefore, the terms sex and gender are not interchangeable. A baby boy who is born with male genitalia will be identified as male. As he grows, however, he may identify with the feminine aspects of his culture.
8a) one thing that cant be denied is their remarkable success in spreading their ideas through their own alternative and almost exclusively online media content in the absence of traditional media, political establishment bodies or other institutional support. It appear as though in the online culture wars those heeding the ideas of the left most closely, from Chomsky’s idea of manufacturing consent to Gramsci’s theory of hegemony and counter hegemony and applying them most strategically were the right
9a) Most of us have grown up learning to appease men. How to give them our space, how to deal with the fact that they dominate any political discussions, that they are paid more, heard more and believed more. However, most of us expect that the men we work with in all the social justice movements we are part of should have at least considered how they are complicit in this domination when they refuse to recognise that it exists. Patriarchy forces men into roles that damage them as well as us. Most of us have men that we love, admire and respect in our lives and for that reason, not only because it damages and diminishes the life experiences of women, we should all be fighting patriarchy together.
9b) There are women who say it’s been so unfair for so long that if a few innocent men get wrongfully accused, that’s a price they are happy to pay. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42200092
How did this whole thing start?
While many of the issues around GamerGate have been percolating for a while, the whole thing can be pinned to a few recent events. In August, Eron Gonji wrote a lengthy post about his relationship with indie game developer Zoe Quinn, whom Gonji said had a romantic relationship with a freelance games reporter in exchange for positive press. While the claims were never proven (sites like Kotaku never ran reviews of Quinn’s game), gamers were upset that the Gonji-Quinn situation didn’t get much attention from the gaming press.

  • Angela Nagle writes in her book “kill all normies”Gemergate brought gamers, rightest chan culture, anti feminism and the online far right closer to mainstreeam discussion and it also politicised a broad group of young people, mostly boys, who organised tactics around the idea of fighting back against the culturewar being waged by the cultural far left.
  • it is hard to think of a better term than Gramscian to describe what they (the alt right) have strategically achieved, as a movement almost entirely based on influencing culture and shifting the Overton window through media and culture, not just formal politics they succeeded by bypassing the dying mainstream media and creating an internet culture and alternative media of their own from the ground up
  • one thing that cant be denied is their remarkable success in spreading their ideas through their own alternative and almost exclusively online media content in the absence of traditional media, political establishment bodies or other institutional support. It appear as though in the online culture wars those heeding the ideas of the left most closely, from Chomsky’s idea of manufacturing consent to Gramsci’s theory of hegemony and counter hegemony and applying them most strategically were the right.
  • Recent online culture wars have reopened many faulty lines within the right as well as the left. Anti trump conservatives of today are deemed cuckservatives by the alt right, the passive passive cuckolding husband to the rapacious non-white foreign enemy at the gates. The neocon and old fashioned Christian right is hated in this way by the alt-right fort, in one way or another failing to protect the nation aggressiveness playing to po nicely and thus not being up to the job of defeating feminism, islamification, mass immigration and so on

The Overton window, also known as the window of discourse, describes the range of ideas tolerated in public discourse. The term is derived from its originator, Joseph P. Overton, a former vice president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, who, in his description of his window, claimed that an idea’s political viability depends mainly on whether it falls within the window, rather than on politicians’ individual preferences.[1][2] According to Overton’s description, his window includes a range of policies considered politically acceptable in the current climate of public opinion, which a politician can recommend without being considered too extreme to gain or keep public office.

  • They(the right) tried to move the culture the opposite direction by restricting speech on the right but expanding the overton window on the left when it came to issues of race and gender, making increasingly anti-male, ant-white, anti-straight , anti-cis rhetoric normal on the cultural left
  • the main preoccupation of this new culture wasgender fluifdityand providing a safe space to explore other concerns like mental ill-health, physical disability, race cultural identity and intersectionality – thenow standard academic term for recognition of multiple varieties of interescting marginalisation and opperssions
  • while the roots of this whole political sensibility may be found in academia the activist culture, its emergence into the mainstream that lead to Hilary using terms like ‘check your privilege’ and ‘intersectionality’ was the culmination of years of online development on tumbler, in fan cultures, on previous platforms like LiveJournal and on a mixture of social media.
  • Tumblr was one of the most influential platforms for the emergence of a whole political and aesthetic sensibility, developing its own vocabulary and style very much the reverse image of the rightest chan in this way. it was here that Walter Benn Michaels critizised as a liberal preferance fore ‘recognition of diversity over economic inequality’ reached its most absurd apotheosis with the politics based on the minutia and the gradations of rapidly proliferating identities, and the emotional injuries of systemic cultural prejudices.
  • Symbolic representatives and diversity and recognition became its goals as it admonished transgressors for erasing my identity and urged white straight men cis people to ‘listen and believe’
  • one is not born a woman but rather becomes a woman wrote french femisit and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir in 1949 by 1990 Judith Butler had taken this several steps further, or perhaps more literally, in Gender Trouble: Feminism and the subversion of identity, in which she argued that the coherence of the categories of sex, gender and sexuality were entirely culturally constructed through repetition of styled and cultivated bodily acts, which created the appearance of an essential ontological ‘core’ gender
  • sexual patterns have emergedas a reslut of the

apotheosis
The highest point in the development of something; a culmination or climax.
“his appearance as Hamlet was the apotheosis of his career”
synonyms: culmination, climax, crowning moment, peak, pinnacle, summit, zenith, apex, acme, apogee, high point, highest point, height, high water mark
“his appearance as Hamlet was the apotheosis of his career”
Cyber-utopianism – the belief that online communication is in itself emancipatory, and that the Internet favors the oppressed rather than the oppressor – has accompanied the Internet from its beginnings; and was the subject of critique by the Critical Art Ensemble as early as 1995.

  • Nagel writes Left cyberutopians claimed that “establishment old media could no longer control politics, that the new public sphere was going to be based on leaderless user generated social media
  • Franky Gafney who’s name poped up when I typed up straight white male into google he wrote an article “Identity politics is utterly ineffective at anything other than dividing people”.
  • Straight white male” is an identity I didn’t choose. I mean it wasn’t a decision I had any say in, what sexuality, race, or gender I am. I was born this way. But also, “straight white male” was never something I chose to “identify” as. At various times if you’d asked me about my identity, I might have said “Irish”, “a Dub”, or “working class”, but never straight, white, or male – let alone the arbitrary combination of all three. But people who talk a lot about “choice” and “freedom” chose for me, and decided that’s what my identity should be reduced to.
  • “A recurrent theme of this ideology is patronising people. It’s a nice word, “patronise” – kind of similar to “mansplain”, except gender-neutral. And time was, people who were into equality wanted to avoid gendered stereotyping, not invent new forms of it. The further irony is the most patronizing people I’ve ever encountered are the people who explain to me why it’s fine to use words and phrases such as “mansplain”, “manspreading”, “toxic masculinity”, “fragile masculinity”, and to use “straight white male” as a pejorative, while simultaneously decrying gender stereotyping and the use of negative genderd terms. The proponents of identity politics discuss these concepts as if they were talking about the second law of thermodynamics, the periodic table of elements, or the disciplinary handbook of the GAA. In actual fact, they are using an imprecise and flimsily justified shorthand jargon. One they can’t so much as agree on among themselves.”

This article was then the subject of another article entitled “Cop on comrades” by Sinead Redmond. which was signed by 250 women.
The stage was set for a discussion on the Irish Times women’s podcast between Gafney and the host. i feel gafney just did not get a fair crack of the whip and was in many ways shouted down by the presenter. She it seemed wanted to give the impression or wanted bto be seen to be giving him a voice and a chance but in actualy fact was just paying lip service to his points and jumping on her own band wagon, the feminist one.
Gafney sets his stall out early on in his article which is fairly water tight, he’s basically asserting the point that the identity politics is characterising him unfairly because he had no choice in being who he is, which i feel is a fairly solid point that you wouldn’t think could be broken apart

  • Sínead Redmond in response to gafney asserts in her artoicle called cop on comerades “In this version of events, straight white men are made to feel uncomfortable about being ‘born this way’ by social media-fuelled ‘political correctness’. They are too afraid to say what they think or express opinions for fear of online retribution” this is a fair point well made I can certainly testify to its validity.

She starts out here agreeing with Gafney but quickly turns and flatters to deceive in the very next sentence she turns the screw and says you should try a week in her shoes

  • “Men who claim to be silenced in this way might try a week or even a day as a vocal woman or person of colour online and see how they deal with the rape threats and threats of racist violence that follow.
  • Redmond does give some attention to the plight of SWM “Working-class ‘straight white men’ in Ireland don’t have it easy these days. They never did. They are ignored by a political class that couldn’t care less about them. They should have a say in the decisions that affect their lives, but they often don’t.
  • Redmond again makes her point clearer again with “However, that doesn’t make them immune to critique. We all have to examine ourselves as oppressor as well as oppressed – because we are all both. The response to the article felt like a silencing to us and we are writing this because we are way past putting up with that. You will see from the names on this letter that we are women who have been in the thick of things. Whether in political parties and organisations, education, trade unions, or grassroots and community-based movements, we are tired of being accused of ‘bourgeois feminism’ and of betraying the struggle when we raise our voices. No campaign in this country could survive without women, without us – our work and energy and knowledge and organising have been instrumental in all the progressive movements in this country. When we say we need to be recognised and respected within our movements, we need you to listen.

Redmond then really hits home and goes for the knock out with

  • “We are working-class women, women of colour, migrant women, trans women, Traveller women, disabled women, queer women, women who are sex workers, women with children, and women who are none of these, active in our communities and committed to an anti-capitalist struggle. We are well aware that a right-wing, neoliberal distortion of feminism and what is called ‘identity politics’ exists. We know this because it erases our experiences and struggles and we resist this erasure through our work as activists every single day. It is distressing and enraging that we also have to fight against the bad faith of fellow activists on the left – mostly men, sometimes women – who, for their own reasons, blur the distinction between this kind of middle-class neoliberal faux-feminism, and a truly radical feminist politics that has class struggle at its very core. This hurts us because it erases and undermines our realities, our suffering, our analyses, and our organising, and gives more strength to the powers that are ranged against us. For many of us, it is heart-breaking to look at some of the men around us and realise that they are nodding in agreement with this erasure of their working class women friends and comrades.
  • Most of us have grown up learning to appease men. How to give them our space, how to deal with the fact that they dominate any political discussions, that they are paid more, heard more and believed more. However, most of us expect that the men we work with in all the social justice movements we are part of should have at least considered how they are complicit in this domination when they refuse to recognise that it exists. Patriarchy forces men into roles that damage them as well as us. Most of us have men that we love, admire and respect in our lives and for that reason, not only because it damages and diminishes the life experiences of women, we should all be fighting patriarchy together.
  • I grew up in Dublin’s inner city, an environment where poverty, violence, and addiction were normal. Given the odds I had to overcome to get where I am today, I thought I’d meet a lot of allies among those who preach equality. But instead, I was often met with open hostility, despite the fact I campaign on a variety of related issues. Why? Because I happen to be straight, white, and male.“Straight white male” is an identity I didn’t choose. I mean it wasn’t a decision I had any say in, what sexuality, race, or gender I am. I was born this way. But also, “straight white male” was never something I chose to “identify” as. At various times if you’d asked me about my identity, I might have said “Irish”, “a Dub”, or “working class”, but never straight, white, or male – let alone the arbitrary combination of all three. But people who talk a lot about “choice” and “freedom” chose for me, and decided that’s what my identity should be reduced to.Although he might also be straight, white and male, it would be perverse to describe Ballymun native and founder of Home Sweet Home Dean Scurry as “privileged”. A few weeks ago Scurry established a new podcast series, Pow Wow with Dean. In the first episode (featuring John Connors and Philly McMahon), Scurry discusses Home Sweet Home’s occupation of Apollo House last December. Within minutes of him releasing this debut, a woman leapt in on Twitter to admonish him for using the word Pow Wow. She confidently asserted it was “not appropriate” because the word “belongs” to “First Nations culture”.I replied that words are not like land, or food, or water. Using them doesn’t deprive anyone else of their use. Words don’t have owners, only users. And the usage here was far from disrespectful, insulting, or “inappropriate”. She went on, as usually happens in these instances, to explain to me why I was wrong.
  • If the CIA or MI5 wanted to encourage a style of “activism” that could consume an infinite amount of energy, yet was utterly ineffective at anything other than dividing people, it would be the prominence of this very type of politics. We need politics that unites us in our shared humanity, for the 99.9 per cent to come together and fight the 0.1 per cent who are stealing the wealth of the Earth, pitting the poor against the poor and entrapping us in ignorance. We do not need politics that explicitly sets out to divide us and perfectly mirrors what it claims to oppose.

Patrick Freyne

  • “You’re not supposed to analyse masculinity,” says psychoanalytic psychotherapist Ray O’Neill. “Once you start questioning masculinity, you’ve already become unmasculine.”

Thttp://www.thejournal.ie/readme/mens-voices-ireland-launch-3048886-Oct2016/he notion that this arrangement categorically precludes all men from having issues is laden with contradictions.
Men also make up the majority of the homeless and the vast majority of those injured or killed in workplace accidents. Almost all of the so-called ‘3D’ jobs – dirty, difficult and dangerous – are done by men. The recent decline of traditionally masculine industries such as construction, along with the falling behind of boys and young men in education, has resulted in Ireland having a so-called ‘reverse’ pay gap of 17% between childless men and women aged 25 – 44.
Men shamed if they failed to ‘man up’
Because society depended on men to be ‘real men’ in order to function, men and boys from traditionalist generations were shamed if they failed to ‘man up’ and face life’s challenges.
Today, even as religious conservatism dies a slow death, attitudes towards men discussing men’s issues have hardly changed. The only difference is that the ones heaping the scorn on men are now self-styled progressives who will openly scoff at the idea that men can be victims of institutionalised sexism.
Nonetheless, such sexism certainly exists. Take for instance the systematic injustice evident in the treatment of Irish fathers before the law. A 2013 doctoral thesis which studied over 1,000 circuit court cases throughout the country found that divorced fathers often find themselves denied access to their own children even if they have been granted joint custody by the court, with access frustration and total parental alienation actually being enabled by the system rather than curtailed by it.
Fathers’ rights
Unmarried fathers enjoy no automatic guardianship rights to their children, even though they are legally obliged to pay maintenance. Without those rights, thousands of fathers have no say in their child’s education, in their religion, or even if they can or cannot be put up for adoption. The only way to obtain such rights is to obtain the consent of the mother, to satisfy a 12-month cohabitation period with the mother, or to take a case to court.
The cohabitation clause in particular was designed to safeguard against rapists and other abusive men from enjoying paternal rights. Put another way, every unmarried father is treated as though he might be a dangerous criminal by an Act that was signed into law just last year. We are living in a time when even the most infinitesimal displays of chauvinism can receive international media coverage, yet blatant sexism and systemic prejudice against men goes totally unchecked.
Underlying all of these men’s issues is a lack of male advocacy groups at a policy level. This is because, unlike the case for women’s advocacy groups, no state funding is available for them.
Men’s issues trivialised
Without a platform to have their concerns heard, men find their issues frequently trivialised or dismissed entirely.
Men’s Voices Ireland is a new, independent group which is working to include these issues and many others in the national dialogue on gender equality. Since our establishment earlier this year we have held numerous meetings raising men’s issues both with TDs, and with organisations including Cosc and the Irish Human Rights and Equality Council (IHREC).
Next month, to mark International Men’s Day, we will be holding our inaugural conference on men’s issues in Dublin.
We envision an Ireland in which men’s issues are recognised as the important societal problems that they are. It’s no longer a question of whether or not men want to talk about their problems, it’s a question of whether or not society will listen to them.
Men’s Voices Ireland Inaugural Conference: ‘Who Cares About Men?’ is being held at Wynn’s Hotel on International Men’s Day, Saturday 19 November. This conference will for the first time bring together a range of expert speakers on serious issues including male suicide, male mental health and family law in a friendly and inclusive environment.
“Hhttps://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/feminists-hate-men-meet-mike-buchanan-the-leader-of-britains-new-justice-for-men-and-boys-party-9977357.html
ad I been denied access to my children after my first divorce, I wouldn’t be speaking to you today, I’ve absolutely no doubt about that. Anyone who’s worked with fathers denied access to their children will know a number who’ve committed suicide.”
Speaking passionately on the subject of fathers’ rights, Buchanan said: “Men are stripped out of their families and become walking wallets because that suits the state. It’s a very well documented feminist objective of 40 years to destroy the nuclear family. You only need to go back to Germaine Greer’s book [The Female Eunuch, 1970] and women like Harriet Harman and Patricia Hewitt have been doing it ever since,” he said. “Oh, God they hate men.”
Buchanan believes that men are perceived as having no value beyond financial. “We have no worth beyond our value to others,” he said, “whereas women are born with worth, they grow up knowing they’re valuable. Women don’t get this, that men just have no worth as human beings except in how they support women and children.”
Buchanan added: “99.7 per cent of refuge places go to battered women, when there are as many battered women as battered men.”
Sandra Horley, chief executive of national domestic violence charity Refuge, told The Independent that abuse of either gender should not be tolerated, although asserted that victims are still predominantly women.

Despite the party’s belief that men are at an unfair disadvantage, Justice for Men and Boys has a “fair” female following. “It’s not a huge number,” Buchanan said, “but a fair number of our supporters are women… they all have a personal reason to support us.”
The Independent originally reported that Buchanan’s two ex-wives supported him. We’d like to clarify that Buchanan’s two children support him in his political endeavours, as he is not in touch with his wives.
Here are a selection of points from JFMAB’s General Election Manifesto:

Parenthood

Children have effectively been removed from the nurturing bosom of the family and, funded by taxpayers’ money, placed under common social care and control in what amounts to state-sponsored institutional child care. Children’s social values are now being shaped by politically correct broader society rather than by their biological parents.

Education

We also take issue with governments continuing to spend large amounts of taxpayers’ money ‘encouraging’girls and young women into STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) subjects and careers. These subjects were historically the routes to careers for many young men, yet the government is spending £30 million ‘encouraging’ women into engineering careers, although women have for decades expressed little interest in engineering as a career choice.

Employment

The state’s policy direction of driving women into paid employment (partly through a tax regime which discourages stay-at-home motherhood) takes no heed of women’s wishes (or otherwise) to enter employment, nor the inevitable impacts on men and children… It should be obvious to the reader that the flipside of ‘advancing the careers of women’ must be ‘holding back the careers of men’.

Domestic violence

When IPV [Intimate Partner Violence] is one-way, the perpetrator is more likely to be a woman than a man. Only 4% of female perpetrators report ‘self-defence’ as a motivation.

Women are as physically aggressive as men towards intimate partners, or more aggressive.
When IPV-related suicides are added to IPV-related murders, men are more likely than women to die as a consequence of IPV.

Rape

Under the current law in England and Wales, when a drunken woman has sex, and later regrets the encounter, she’s deemed not to have been in a position to give consent, so she can claim to have been raped. A man in the same situation typically wouldn’t see the encounter in that way – even if he was drunk, and the woman sober.

Mental health

Many of the state’s policy directions contribute to the persistently high male suicide rate, including:

– denying fathers reasonable access to their children following family breakdowns
– weakening the institutions of marriage and the nuclear family
– lack of support for male victims of intimate partner violence (IPV)

Criminal Justice System

The justice system in general is institutionally biased against men, and is the direct cause of a scandalous ‘gender justice gap’.P-WAMII2016 Infographic image

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Meanwhile, the report found that the vast majority of those (98%) who were looking after homes and families in 2016 were women. This was 445,500 women compared to just 9,200 men.
However, the number of men looking after homes and families nearly doubled in 10 years up to 2016, rising from 4,900 to 9,200.
Men work longer hours than women in paid employment, according to the report.
In 2016, men worked an average of 39.7 hours a week in paid employment, compared to 31.7 hours for women.
Similarly, men have a higher rate of employment, which stood at 69.9% in 2016, whereas the female rate was 59.5%.
More men worked in the labour force in 2016, at 67.8% compared to women at 51.5%.
Women are significantly underrepresented in decision-making structures in Ireland at both national and regional levels, the report said.
Just 22.2% of TDs in Dáil Éireann were women in 2016 and they accounted for only 21.4% of members of Local Authorities. The average female representation in national parliaments in the EU in 2016 was 28.7%.
The report also looked at the gender differences in Irish prisons.
It found that four out of every five people committed to prison in 2016 were men – 10,209 men, compared to 2,644 women.

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